Last Updated November 27th, 2007

Are You Building Your Children's Bones?

There was an interesting report on the evening news that I just had to look up and share tonight. It was about how broken bones are becoming more common in children. Not only that, they’re getting rickets.

Two factors are the major causes. One is that kids aren’t getting enough milk or other calcium sources; the other is that they aren’t getting enough sunshine, and so develop vitamin D deficiencies.

bones

It’s not just that broken bones happen more easily in childhood if you aren’t building their bones either. It is suspected that osteoporosis will also become more common because bone density is not being built early on.

Rickets can be quite serious. The article noted a case where a little boy had it bad enough that his leg bowed and he could no longer run because his legs hurt so much.

Of course, there are plenty of things you can do to help your kids have stronger bones. Make sure they get plenty of calcium in their diets daily, whether from dairy sources or other sources such as broccoli. Make sure they play outside a lot. 10-15 minutes a day is a minimum. Makes me glad that I walk my daughter to and from school daily. We get plenty of sunshine during that time, and her school gives a decent recess. An hour of general physical activity is also needed, in or out of the sun.

If you’ve been having trouble getting enough calcium in your kids’ diets, think about what you can switch. Get them to drink more milk, for example, or serve yogurt sometimes for breakfast. Cheese in sandwiches or on pizza. There are lots of ways to encourage your children to take in more of what their bodies need if you fear they haven’t had enough lately.

[tags]childrens bones,rickets,health,children,kids,family,stronger bones[/tags]

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Last Updated August 16th, 2007

Don't Give Your Baby Cough Syrup

I’ve heard before that cough medicine really isn’t effective for children. But now the FDA has come out with an advisory that you should not give cough medicines to children under two without a doctor’s order.

I think most parents have done this, though. I certainly know I’ve had a simply miserable time getting my husband to understand that these have been shown to be not all that effective, if effective at all, for children. But if he’s the one to buy medicine when they’re sick, it’s a cold medicine that includes something for cough. Probably because it’s so hard to find a plain decongestant now that pseudophedrine is behind the pharmacist’s counter. I miss being able to easily buy children’s Sudafed.

It’s important to pay attention to this warning, however, and I hope labeling on the bottles makes it clearer. Children under 2 are more likely to have complications from cough medicines, including death. And it may pay to keep in mind that some find it dangerous to give cough medicines to children under 6.

My own suggestion would be that if your kids are in those age groups, just get rid of any medications that include something for cough that you have for them. They don’t seem to do a whole lot anyhow. Use a humidifier and maybe a decongestant or fever reducer as necessary. Don’t bother with anything that isn’t all that effective.

[tags]babies,cough syrup,cough medicine,fda warning,family,children[/tags]

Disclosure: Some of the links in this post may be 'affiliate links.' This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission.

Last Updated November 16th, 2006

Why Do People Make Such a Fuss?

Yet another mother has been harrassed for breastfeeding in a place someone else felt was inappropriate. In this case it was on an airplane. A flight attendant made her get off the plane because she refused to cover up with a blanket.

Now, the woman insists she was being discreet. Next to last row, window seat. Not that the people behind her would have been able to see anything anyhow without some effort. You know how tall airline seats are and how narrow the gap between them

Clearly that flight attendant had no clue about babies. Breastfeeding a baby on a plane that is just about to take off isn’t just about feeding the baby. It’s about making takeoff comfortable so that baby doesn’t cry for the entire flight, making everyone, flight attendants included, utterly miserable. Read the rest of this entry »

Disclosure: Some of the links in this post may be 'affiliate links.' This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission.

Last Updated November 7th, 2006

Coping with a Child Who Doesn't Talk

It’s hard waiting for Gage to start talking. At 20 months of age, he has about 4 words… mama, bye bye, uh oh and up. That’s up from 3 words at 18 months, so it’s very slow going.

It’s not that he doesn’t seem to be bright. He understands just about everything we tell him. He can communicate his wants very well. He just doesn’t talk.

The hard times is when he’s asking for something that isn’t routine. It can be a very frustrating guessing game.

This morning he was pointing and grunting loudly at something on the counter. My first answer was “No, it’s too early to have Halloween candy.” But he kept at it and I realized that wasn’t what he was after. So I picked him up and had him show me. Turned out he wanted to play with the oven mitts.

We’ve talked about working on sign language, but the challenge is that we aren’t sure if it will slow verbal development still more, and my inlaws, who watch him nearly once a week for at least a few hours, are reluctant to participate. I would really want that support for his sake, otherwise he’ll have a very frustrating time coping with people who don’t understand what he’s saying. Read the rest of this entry »

Disclosure: Some of the links in this post may be 'affiliate links.' This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission.

Last Updated September 10th, 2006

Speak!

I can hardly wait for when my son, Gage, decides to start really talking. He’s a quiet kid. Says “mama,” “bye-bye,” “uh oh” and just recently added the occasional “up” to his repertoire. Since he’s 18 months old, this does get frustrating and just a little concerning.

I have spoken with his doctor at his most recent checkup, however, and been advised to wait another three months, then update the doctor so we can decide what to do. Since we know he hears, and he seems to understand things quite well, the doctor is not particularly concerned yet. Some kids are just late talkers.

But how do you know if it’s a late talker or a problem you need to be concerned about? That’s been one of my main concerns, since I know that in case of a problem, the earlier he gets help, the better.

I’m fortunate in that I can see many signs of a normal little boy in Gage. He’s active, inquisitive, loves to paint (himself… mostly on his legs and chest). He does get his wants across to us, is interested in sitting on the potty… in other words, is mostly quite age appropriate. He just shows a lot of signs of shyness and doesn’t talk much. Read the rest of this entry »

Disclosure: Some of the links in this post may be 'affiliate links.' This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission.

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