March 2nd, 2015

Can You Get Paid to Use Twitter and Facebook?

Can You Get Paid to Use Twitter and Facebook?

Using Twitter, Facebook and other social media websites can take big chunks out of your work at home day. They’re something most of us have to learn how to manage our time, so it only takes up as much time as we can allow. But if you really love using social media, wouldn’t it be nice to get paid to do so?

It’s not impossible. Many companies need someone to take care of their social media. Obviously, this kind of work is different from managing your own accounts and socializing with your friends, but it’s a job that requires you to use social media, and can often be done from home. Some companies expect you to work in their office, of course.

What Does a Social Media Manager Do?

The basic job of a social media manager is to manage the business’ social media effectively. While some feel it is difficult to measure the effectiveness of social media campaigns – it’s very difficult to draw a direct connection between social media results and sales in many cases. Nonetheless, a healthy social media presence is a benefit to businesses – it’s one more way to for customers to connect with you.

To help with this, a social media manager must do several things:

1. Understand what your audience needs from the business.

Social media has a large impact on how people view the brand. It’s up to you to know how your employer’s brand should look on social media. What do people buy from the business, and what do they want to know from it? Your social media efforts should help your audience in those areas.

This also involves knowing where your audience is. Your efforts won’t be effective if you focus on Facebook when your target audience prefers Instagram or Twitter.

2. Engage with your audience.

Social media is where many people go when they just can’t get results from a business any other way. How often have you heard stories from people who said they had a problem with a company, and it was only resolved when they complained about it on social media?

A social media manager makes sure these complaints get taken care of if at all possible. You have to know how to handle a wide range of problems, or who to talk to if you don’t know what to do. Problems that are left unresolved or ignored may only get worse on social media. Word can spread quickly. When possible, it’s better to make it word of how well the problem was handled, rather than how awful your response or lack thereof was.

Other times, you may be answering simple questions about the company. People are usually happy to have their question answered directly from the company, even if they didn’t direct it right at you.

You will also need to be aware of any threats to the business. Hopefully this is a rare thing, but if there is a threat, you will want to have it handled appropriately, even if that means calling the authorities. Online threats can be difficult to handle, as not all police departments know what to do about it themselves, but you need to pay attention.

3. Share content.

While much of your employer’s content creation may be handled by bloggers, you have to make it work with social media – phrasing things effectively for the limits of each platform, choosing the right images, right timing and so forth.

Make sure your content works with other promotions going on. Other kinds of advertising may refer people to the business’s social accounts – be sure the messages work well together.

4. Advertise your social presence and build a following.

Many social networks allow you to pay to promote your content, so you can get in front of more people and build your following. These may appear different from your regular social media content. Know whether you’re trying to make sales directly with paid social advertising or if you’re more focused on building a following. A solid following on social media can have long term benefits for a business, so even though it doesn’t show immediate results financially, it can be a very worthwhile goal.

5. Build conversions.

A solid following does very little good if it doesn’t convert into paying customers. You may be able to use your social media efforts to capture leads for other types of marketing or bring in sales. 100,000 fans or followers have very little value if none of them buy anything from you.

6. Show a good ROI.

Proving that your social media work is giving a good return on investment can be difficult, but it’s part of the job to prove that what you’re doing is worthwhile. Analyze the results you’ve gotten each week, not only so you can show what gave a good return, but so that you learn what kinds of things do better and worse.

How Do You Get the Job?

As with any other job, employers hope to find social media managers with the experience to help them reach their goals. You have to find a way to show that first employer that you have what it takes to do the job.

Marketing experience is a big help. A degree in Marketing isn’t a must, but if you don’t have that, some sort of experience you can show is.

You can expect potential employers to want to look at your own social media profiles. If you can’t show that you post interesting things regularly, or if you haven’t built your own following very well, why would an employer want you to manage their social media marketing? Your profiles are highly relevant, so make sure they look appropriate. Ideally, you should be able to show examples on multiple platforms, and show that you know how to work with each one.

You can spot openings on various job boards, as well as on the social media pages of various companies. Sites such as Jobs In Social Media specialize in this kind of job opening. Regular job boards such as Monster and Indeed also have listings you may find of interest. Remember that not all will be flexible or home based.

Freelancing is another option. Rather than work for one company, take on a variety of clients who need help with their social media. Freelancing can be both more flexible and more demanding, depending on the relationship between you and your clients. Check sites such as Elance, Guru and oDesk for openings.

Beware These Social Media Mistakes

Many people make serious mistakes with their social media profiles or when talking to potential clients or employers. If you want to become a social media professional, don’t make these mistakes:

1. Badmouth current or previous clients, anywhere.

Whether on your own social media, on someone’s social media account you’re managing, or in conversation with a potential client or employer, don’t say negative things about your other clients, past or present. It only makes you look bad, and makes potential employers wonder what you’ll say about them.

2. Link dropping.

Do not drop links to your social media pages or regular websites when they aren’t relevant, especially if the only thing you post is the link. You aren’t making that page look any better, and you aren’t getting people interested in visiting it.

3. Post about your services when they aren’t relevant to the conversation.

Similar to link dropping is posting about your services or the company you’re trying to promote when they aren’t relevant to the conversation at hand. You’ll look much better if you participate in the conversation and keep it relevant.

4. Be overly personal.

You should be a little personal on social media, but keep it within reason. Some things you should share only with friends, not with the rest of the world. Keep the really personal stuff to the profiles that only your personal friends can see; don’t share it with the world.

5. Be boring.

At the same time, don’t be so impersonal that you’re boring. Allow your posts to sound like a real person without posting the things you don’t need random people to know about you. Be funny when funny is appropriate, serious when serious is appropriate, and so forth. You’re human – show it.

6. Stress about posting the right amount daily.

There are all kinds of theories about how often and what time you should post on social media. While you should be aware of these observations, don’t let them entirely rule you. If you don’t have something worthwhile to post, don’t. Quality is much more important than quantity.

Disclosure: I often review or mention products for which I may receive compensation in the form of affiliate commissions. All opinions are my own.

February 18th, 2015

No More Affiliate Links, Redirects or Trackers on Pinterest

No More Affiliate Links, Redirects or Trackers on Pinterest

Affiliate links are no longer allowed on Pinterest. For many companies with affiliate programs, this is nothing new – Pinterest hasn’t allowed Amazon affiliate links for some time, for example. But now they no longer allow even those few companies they had allowed. The pins won’t be deleted, but all tracking information will be removed.

Pinterest says it’s to improve the user experience, although many suspect that it has more to do with upcoming monetization. Pinterest says that’s not the case, however. Affiliate links and redirects can make it harder for rich pins to work accurately.

Of course, all is not lost if you’ve been careful to keep your affiliate links more on your own site, under your own control. This has always been the most sensible way to handle affiliate links, as it builds your own property and your own reputation. When you build on your own property, your links are valid as long as you’re a part of that affiliate program.

It may be harder to promote through Pinterest this way, as you have to come up with the content, but in the long run it can be a more effective strategy. Pinterest can be a part of your marketing strategy, but your focus should always be on your own properties, with social media marketing as a tool to direct traffic to your properties.

It takes more effort, certainly, to build your own properties and content, but the results can be well worth it. You don’t have to worry that you’ll lose your account on a particular social media site, that policies will change there or that it will lose its popularity. While these things can still happen, it’s less important when that site is only a part of how your promote your own, rather than something you rely upon for your income.

This kind of thing can happen on any platform you use that you don’t control. On your own website, you decide when affiliate links are appropriate. All you have to obey are the rules of the hosting company, and those aren’t at all likely to change in ways that harm your online business – it’s too easy to switch someplace new. But the platforms you use to market your business may change at any time. It’s better to direct traffic from them to your website, then to your recommendations, than to put your recommendations where they can vanish at any time.

Disclosure: I often review or mention products for which I may receive compensation in the form of affiliate commissions. All opinions are my own.

February 2nd, 2015

Beware the IRS Impersonators Phone Scam

Beware the IRS Impersonators Phone Scam

Have you ever received a phone call from the IRS? There’s a big scam that has been going around with people claiming to be from the IRS and demanding immediate payment of taxes owed. Sometimes they even have the last 4 digits of your Social Security Number, making them sound more official. But they aren’t. Even if you happen to owe back taxes, this isn’t how the IRS goes about collecting them.

The scammers make it all sound scary. My brother-in-law got this call some time back, and it worried him, because he hadn’t heard of the scam before. Fortunately, he didn’t fall for it, but it did make him nervous. Most people aren’t comfortable with being told that the police are on their way to your door if you don’t pay up, and that’s one of the threats these people use to make victims pay up. They may even call back to really push you.

If you get a call claiming to be from the IRS, and they’re demanding immediate payment by credit, debit or money transfer, it’s a scam. If you’re in doubt, the press release from the IRS on this issue says you can call 800-829-1040 if you think you really do owe back taxes and have a question on payments, or visit http://www.treasury.gov/tigta/contact_report_scam.shtml if you don’t, but still want to report the scam.

As with many other scams, avoiding this one comes down to knowing who’s really contacting you. You can always visit the IRS website or contact them yourselves when you’re in doubt, just as you would contact your bank if you received an email saying there was a problem with your account, but you weren’t certain it was from them. You should always try to look things up when it’s not clear if something is legitimate. Don’t share any personal or financial information when you aren’t certain that something is legitimate.

Disclosure: I often review or mention products for which I may receive compensation in the form of affiliate commissions. All opinions are my own.

December 29th, 2014

How to Make Sure You Don’t Overwork When You Work at Home

How to Make Sure You Don't Overwork When You Work at Home

There’s an image many people have of working at home – sofa, bonbons, television, pajamas… we all know the stereotypes. But the reality is different for many. Many people have a lot of trouble separating their work life from their home life when they work at home, and often overdo it on the work side of things. It’s just so easy to go back to work in the evenings when the house is quiet at last, or excuse yourself from the family because you just want to get a little more done. Before long, you’re working so much that you aren’t making enough time for your family, and feeling overworked.

Just about any job will give you those times when you feel overworked, even if you don’t work at home, of course. Retail workers have the holiday season, software developers have deadlines, and so forth. It’s often not different when you work at home, except that some people find it too easy to overwork when they don’t need to and really shouldn’t. Your office is right there in your home, and it’s all too easy to go back to it when you should be living the other parts of your life. How do you avoid this?

Set Goals Beyond Work

It’s good to have goals for the work you do. It’s one of the most effective ways of getting things done. You should also set goals for other things in your life, such as time with your family, leisure reading, leisure activities and so forth.

These don’t have to be very strict – in fact I recommend against making too strict of goals for most personal things as you don’t want to take away the spontaneity that makes life more fun. Goals can be as simple as stopping work every day by a certain time so you can be with your family. You don’t have to plan things for each day, just know that you will make time for them.

Cut Back on Makework

We all have things in our routine we do that we really don’t need to do. Maybe you’re checking your social media accounts more often you should; maybe it’s your email. Maybe you spend too much time trying to learn new ideas for your business and not enough time trying to make it work. Seek out the things that aren’t really necessary in your work day and cut them out.

Automate… Reasonably

There’s a lot to be said for well done automation in your work day. If you post a lot on social media, some of that can be scheduled in advance. If you type a lot, you can set up macros for words and phrases you type frequently, and greatly increase your typing speed. You can set up stock replies for questions you commonly receive by email, so that you only need to adapt them to answer the exact question asked, rather than start the whole thing from scratch.

Things like these can save quite a bit of time. They cost a little when you get them set up, but should pay back nicely in time saved later.

Know What Can Wait

If you’re running a home based business, there are probably always more things you’d like to get done than you possibly can get done in a day. Odds are, some of it really can wait until later. Figure out what’s really not that urgent and find a better place in your calendar for it.

Hire Help

When it can’t wait and you can’t automate it, sometimes hiring help is the best way to get things done in your home business. There’s always some stress in hiring someone – there’s that bit of training and explanation you have to do even with an experienced virtual assistant. Once things get going, however, having that help can really ease your workload.

Know How You Work Best

It’s hard to work effectively if you’re pushing yourself to work at the wrong times or in the wrong ways. Early bird, night owl, get off to a fast start or start things slow, we all have our own ways of working that are best for us. When you have the option, pay attention how you work best and use that to your advantage.

Do the Most Important Things First

You should always know what you most need to get done and prioritize that, whether it’s a long term priority or an emergency that just came up. Sometimes these things will mean that you can’t pay attention to your preferred work times or styles, but when you have to get things done, that’s how it goes.

Take Breaks

Get away from your work regularly through your day. Go for a walk in your neighborhood or hit the gym for a little while. Do some household chores; just not so many or so often that they’re a problem for your work day. Do some leisure reading. Just relax during your lunch or snack breaks.

Giving your mind time away from your work is a big help in being more productive. This is especially useful if you’re dealing with a difficult problem. Focusing on it too long can actually make it harder to solve, while a break gives your mind time away from the problem directly which can make it easier to solve.

Set Boundaries

Set boundaries – not only about your work time, but about your personal time. Know when you’ll allow the personal to interfere with the professional and vice versa. You probably shouldn’t let a chatty neighbor or a door to door salesperson distract you from your work day for long at all, while a sick child or crying baby probably needs more immediate attention.

Similarly, when you’re off work, be off work. Don’t head back into your home office at times you should be enjoying the rest of your life without good reason. If there’s a crisis, yes, you may have to step away from family time. If you just want to check your email and aren’t expecting something, you’re probably better off staying away, because that one little thing can turn into a dozen little things and then you’ve missed out.

Schedule Social Media and Other Time Sucks

Social media has its place when you work at home, but it can turn into a huge time suck. Set limits on how long you can spend on social media, email and anything else that tends to suck up more of your day than it should. Pick times to work on those things when they won’t interfere with more important things you need to get done. Social media and email can be very important themselves, but odds are there are more important yet things you need to work on most of the day.

Disclosure: I often review or mention products for which I may receive compensation in the form of affiliate commissions. All opinions are my own.

November 18th, 2014

7 Ways to Release Your Creativity

7 Ways to Release Your Creativity

Keeping up your creative side can be difficult at time when you run your own business. We all hit that slump sometimes where the ideas, of whatever sort we need, just don’t come as nicely. There are ways, however, that you can try to release your creativity when you’re feeling stuck, or just when you need a little boost.

1. Take a walk.

If you’re feeling stuck, taking a walk can be a big help. Get yourself away from working directly on your project and get some fresh air. Around the block, or a hike in nature if you can afford that much time away.

2. Play with play dough.

Fiddle around with play dough for a while. Don’t worry about what you’re making or if it relates to what you need to get done. Just have a little fun and get your mind off your work for a little.

3. Draw.

Draw anything. It doesn’t have to make sense or look good. Scribble if that helps you. Wendy Piersall has been doing one 15 minute art project a day, and has learned a lot about how she works and what she’d like to improve.

4. Write anything.

It doesn’t matter what you write, just write whatever comes to mind, even if it’s one word over and over.

4. Daydream.

Let your mind wander for a while. Trying to focus too long on your work can really kill your creativity. Take that mental break for a little while, even when you can’t get away.

5. Know what you want to do.

It’s easier to be creative if you know more or less what you want to end up with. It’s really hard to get anywhere when you haven’t defined an end point.

6. Look at problems a new way.

If you’re facing a problem, and a solution just isn’t coming to you, find a new way to look at it. This can be as simple as writing on paper something you’ve been working with on the computer, or solving a simpler version of the same problem and seeing if the simpler solution can help you reach the more difficult one.

7. Bounce ideas off someone else.

Talk out your challenges with someone. Even if they don’t really understand what you’re trying to do, it can help, and sometimes they’ll even have ideas that will get you moving in the right direction.

Disclosure: I often review or mention products for which I may receive compensation in the form of affiliate commissions. All opinions are my own.

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Disclosure: Home with the Kids is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com. I also review or mention products for which I may receive compensation from other sources. All opinions are my own.