June 25th, 2013

Write a Book – Day 25 of 30 Days of Keeping Kids Busy During the Summer

30 Days of Keeping Kids Busy During the Summer

Some kids really express themselves well in writing. They may enjoy writing their own book over the summer.

Let your child pick the subject or plan the story. It’s their book after all, although you can give advice. Depending on age, they can write it all out by hand or type it on the computer. Writing it out by hand is great practice for kids, especially those who need to improve their handwriting. Don’t forget the illustrations.

For kids too young to write, you can have them dictate the story to you. You won’t get free time for yourself this way, but your child will appreciate it.

Binding the book can be as simple as holes punched in each page and some yarn, or you can do a better job. You can even consider having your child write it in a journal so that it’s already bound.

Write a Book - Day 25 of 30 Days of Keeping Kids Busy During the Summer

Disclosure: Some of the links in this post may be 'affiliate links.' This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission.

June 23rd, 2013

Chore Sticks – Day 23 of 30 Days of Keeping Kids Busy During the Summer

30 Days of Keeping Kids Busy During the Summer

Here’s how you handle things when the kids say they’re bored and want you to help them figure out what to do. Take a bunch of popsicle sticks, and write a chore on each one, and place in the jar. Have the kids draw a chore stick from a jar when they say they’re bored.

The idea here is to encourage your kids to find their own way to keep busy. If they can’t find their own way to play, you make it less fun.

These don’t have to be big chores. All you need is enough work that kids don’t want to complain of boredom to you. Most will quickly learn to find something to do other than chores.

And of course, the chore sticks are also good when you actually need the kids to get some chores done. You can have them draw their assignments or have them compete to see who can complete the most chore stick assignments in a given amount of time. Some kids love to compete on stuff like that.

Here are some age appropriate chore ideas to get you started. The ages are approximate and the list is just ideas. You can probably think of more things your child can do at each age.:

Toddler (ages 2-3)

  • Pick up/put away toys
  • Pick up dirty clothes and put in hamper
  • Unload the dishwasher (unbreakable items, nothing sharp)
  • Dust with cloth
  • Help move clothes from washer to dryer
  • Make bed

Preschooler (ages 4-5)

  • All previous chores
  • Set/clear table
  • Wash dishes with supervision
  • Load dishwasher
  • Help sort laundry
  • Match socks
  • Sort trash vs recycling
  • Weed (after teaching what weeds are, supervision recommended)
  • Water plants
  • Feed pets

Early Elementary (ages 6-8)

  • All previous chores
  • Assist with meal prep (make salad, find ingredients, etc.)
  • Help cook
  • Vacuum
  • Help put away groceries
  • Fold laundry
  • Put away laundry after folding
  • Take out trash/recycling
  • Get mail
  • Read to younger siblings
  • Rake leaves
  • Clean up after dog or cat

Elementary (ages 9-11)

  • All previous chores
  • Make simple meals
  • Take dog for walk
  • Wash car
  • Take garbage/recycling to the curb
  • Mop floors

Middle School (ages 12-14)

  • All previous chores
  • Make full meals/meal plan
  • Clean out fridge/freezer

High School (ages 15-18 or until they leave home)

  • All previous chores
  • Any chore they haven’t learned yet but will need to do as an adult

See, Mom? I TOLD you chores would be part of the list!

Chore Sticks - Day 23 of 30 Days of Keeping Kids Busy During the Summer

Disclosure: Some of the links in this post may be 'affiliate links.' This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission.

June 22nd, 2013

Workbooks/Crossword Puzzles/Sudoku – Day 22 of 30 Days of Keeping Kids Busy During the Summer

30 Days of Keeping Kids Busy During the Summer

I like to keep my kids’ minds agile over the summer. It should be more fun than what they did in school all year if possible, however. Having your kids work in workbooks, on crossword puzzles or sudoku can help them keep up some of the skills they learned in school.

There are always plenty of books out there for kids of all ages. Online educational games and such too, but sometimes it’s best to have the kids stick to the books.

Workbooks/Crossword Puzzles/Sudoku - Day 22 of 30 Days of Keeping Kids Busy During the Summer

Disclosure: Some of the links in this post may be 'affiliate links.' This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission.

June 21st, 2013

Backyard Games – Day 21 of 30 Days of Keeping Kids Busy During the Summer

30 Days of Keeping Kids Busy During the Summer

What kinds of games do you have that can be played in the backyard? We have a bocce ball set, and the kids have expressed an occasional interest in a croquet set. Whatever sort of backyard game equipment you have, it could be just right for keeping the kids busy.

These can be simple things that take only one person, such as a hula hoop or a jump rope, or complex enough to keep a number of kids busy. I tend to favor things that take a few kids, in part because I have three, but also because a group of kids often plays longer… so long as arguments don’t derail things.

Backyard Games - Day 21 of  30 Days of Keeping Kids Busy During the Summer

Disclosure: Some of the links in this post may be 'affiliate links.' This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission.

June 20th, 2013

Obstacle Course – Day 20 of 30 Days of Keeping Kids Busy During the Summer

30 Days of Keeping Kids Busy During the Summer

A lot of kids love obstacle courses. They’ll keep going on them for a while, sometimes adding new obstacles or changing the rules to make them more challenging. Best of all, you decide what items can be used to make obstacles, and it can be done indoors or out.

A simple 2×4 makes a great balance beam. Obviously you should use great caution in allowing any sort of raised balance beam; make sure it’s secure and age appropriate, but even just on the ground works for younger kids.

You don’t have to buy any special equipment; just take a look at what you already own. You can line up chairs to make a tunnel through the legs, for example, or have the kids dribble a ball to the next obstacle.

Obstacle Course - Day 20 of 30 Days of Keeping Kids Busy During the Summer

Disclosure: Some of the links in this post may be 'affiliate links.' This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission.

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