10 Tips To Get Started On Pinterest

I like Pinterest. I don’t make as much time for it as I should, but it’s fun to use and sometimes drives good traffic. I’ve had a pin for one of my other sites get more than 500 repins so far, which isn’t as amazing as some get, but is still pretty good. Still, there are some things you should know as you get started on Pinterest.

1. Be sure you have permission to pin images on Pinterest.

Many people assume that they can pin just any image they want. That’s really not the case.

If you’re pinning from someone else’s site, check for a Pin It link or other indication that it’s okay to use. It’s kind of a drag when you really want to pin something, but if there’s no indication that it’s okay, you could be committing copyright infringement if someone doesn’t want their images shared on Pinterest.

2. Know if your own images are okay to share.

If it’s a photograph you took or a graphic you created from scratch, obviously it’s fine to use on Pinterest if that’s what you want. If it’s a stock image you got on another site, it may not be okay. Check your license.

There are sites that offer photos and graphics that should be free to use. Just be careful, as you can’t be absolutely certain that the person sharing it on the site actually has permission to declare it free to use. I enjoy using Open Clipart and Morgue File when I don’t have something of my own and don’t feel up to creating something.

3. Share more than stuff from your own site.

As a blogger, you’re probably using Pinterest in part to promote your own stuff. Share more than that – it makes your account more interesting for people to follow.

4. Separate your personal and business Pinterest accounts.

Pinterest allows businesses to have their own Pinterest accounts. This is a good thing. You can make your business account focused on items relevant to your business, while keeping your personal pins to yourself.

5. Use images on your site with Pinterest in mind.

Make sure the images you place on your site are Pinterest-friendly. That not only means using images where you have the copyright issues under control, but that will help draw people to your post when they see it. Make it really relevant, and use text in your images to help people know what it’s about.

6. Pin regularly.

I really don’t do this enough. I just don’t. Admittedly, this site doesn’t do that well on Pinterest anyhow – work at home stuff isn’t the kind of visual or crafty thing that does well there. Still, I like finding relevant pins to share and wish I could make the time to do so more often. Regular pinning of content, even when it’s not your own, can help you build a following so that pins to your site have a chance at a wider audience.

7. Connect with your Facebook and/or Twitter account.

You can use your Facebook or Twitter account to log into your Pinterest account. This also make it easy to share your pins through those accounts.

8. Use keywords.

Use relevant keywords as you write descriptions for your pins. This makes them easier for people to find when they search Pinterest.

9. Make pinboards relevant to blog posts.

A pinboard of relevant content can be a good supplement to a blog post. You can start it simple and make it grow over time. Link to the pinboard in your post, and don’t forget to include any content of your own that relates.

10. Don’t expect immediate results.

As with any other free promotion method, it takes time to see results for Pinterest. You have to build a following and get a feel for the things that do well on Pinterest.