Working at home is great. No commute, and you’re there for your family. But you’re also there with the refrigerator and any snack food you have handy, plus you’re spending hours sitting in front of the computer. It may not be so good for your health.

It’s easy to skip fitness when you work at home. I’m not talking about weight as such, but more about remembering to exercise and have generally healthy eating habits.

Doing this is both easier and harder than when you work outside the home. You’re home, and that means it takes a bit of extra motivation to head out to exercise. But it also means you have more control over the foods readily available to you, plus more time to eat right if you care to take it.

The foods you keep available in the house are key to keeping healthy while working at home. If you buy a lot of unhealthy snacks, you’re going to eat them. If you have healthy foods around that are easy to snack on, you’re more likely to choose them than to head out to the store for something less healthy.

If you like raw vegetables, it’s helpful to have some chopped up and ready to be eaten. This makes them into a very convenient snack, not one that’s going to take several minutes out of your work day just to prepare. Anything that takes up too much preparation time is likely to be ignored in favor of something simpler. They’re also great to have ready to offer to kids as snacks.

A good water bottle is also helpful. I keep a bottle of water at my desk at all times. It keeps me hydrated and keeps me from eying less healthy drinks. I like my bottles with a straw so that not too much spills if it gets knocked over – vital around the computer! Sports bottle styles are easier to find and good at keeping spills contained also.

To limit waste and keep it cheap, I suggest buying a stainless steel water bottle. If you don’t like your tap water, buy a Brita or other water filtration system. You’ll save a lot of money compared to buying little disposable water bottles.

Do your best to have an ergonomic setup at your workstation. Your chair should have good lumbar support and be the right size for you. Your keyboard, mouse and monitor should be at appropriate heights. I also like having an ergonomic keyboard. You want to avoid the repetitive stress injuries that can put you out of work for a long time and even result in surgery to fix the damage.

Perhaps most important is to take breaks during your work day. Get up once an hour or so and stretch. Get up a couple times a day and do some aerobic exercise. it doesn’t have to be anything complex, and you don’t have to have a gym membership to do it, unless you want one. A walk around the block or several blocks is easy and healthy.

It’s just a little extra effort to keep on a healthy track, yet far too easy to not make that effort. What works for you?